Front Ankle Pain : Signs, Causes, Treatment and Prevention

Front Ankle Pain : Signs, Causes, Treatment and Prevention Tips

Do you ever experience pain in your front ankle? If so, you’re not alone. This type of pain is quite common, and several different factors can contribute to it. In this blog post, we will explore the signs, causes, treatment, and prevention of front ankle pain.

What is Front Ankle Pain?

What is Front Ankle Pain?

The front ankle is the joint where the shinbone (tibia) and calf bone (fibula) meet. The ankle allows for movement in three planes: up and down (dorsiflexion and plantar flexion), side to side (inversion and eversion), and rotation.

There are many different causes of front ankle pain, but the most common cause is an injury to the ligaments or tendons that support the ankle. This can happen from a fall, direct blow, or overuse. Other causes of front ankle pain include arthritis, gout, infection, and tumors.

Signs and symptoms of front ankle pain include swelling, bruising, tenderness to touch, inability to put weight on the affected foot, and joint instability.

If you think you may have a ligament or tendon injury, it is important to see a doctor right away so that they can diagnose the extent of the injury and recommend treatment. Treatment options for front ankle pain depend on the underlying cause but may include rest, ice, compression, elevation, anti-inflammatory medication, physical therapy, immobilization in a boot or cast, and surgery.

Prevention of front ankle pain includes wearing proper shoes that support the foot and avoiding high-impact activities if you are at risk for injury.

Signs and Symptoms of Front Ankle Pain

Signs and Symptoms of Front Ankle Pain

There are many signs and symptoms of front ankle pain. They include:

Pain in the front of the ankle

One of the most common signs of front ankle pain is a pain in the front of the ankle. The pain may be sharp or dull and can vary from mild to severe.

Swelling

Another common sign of front ankle pain is swelling. Sometimes, Swelling may occur immediately after an injury or may develop over time. If the swelling is severe, it may cause the foot and ankle to feel tight or “full.”

Bruising

Bruising is another common sign of front ankle pain. Maybe, Bruising may occur immediately after an injury or may develop over time. The bruising may be mild or severe and can vary in color from blue to black.

Tenderness

Tenderness is another common sign of front ankle pain. Also, Tenderness usually occurs along with swelling and bruising. The affected area may be too painful to touch.

Stiffness

Stiffness is another common sign of front ankle pain. Sometimes, Stiffness usually occurs after the swelling and bruising have subsided. The affected joint may feel “tight” or difficult to move.

Redness

Ankle pain may also be accompanied by redness. Also, Redness usually occurs along with swelling and bruising. The affected area may feel warm to the touch. Also, redness may be seen on X-rays of the ankle.

Numbness

Numbness is another common sign of front ankle pain. Also, Numbness usually occurs after the swelling and bruising have subsided. The affected area may feel tingly or “pins and needles” like.

Types of Ankle Pain

Types of Ankle Pain

Ankle pain is one of the most common types of pain, and can happen for many different reasons. Here are some of the most common causes of ankle pain:

Achilles Tendonitis

This is a condition in which the Achilles tendon, a tendon that runs along the back of your ankle, becomes inflamed. It can cause sudden, intense pain when you move your foot or ankle, and may make it difficult to walk or run. Achilles tendonitis is often caused by overuse (such as walking on hard surfaces), being overweight, or having a high mileage on your feet.

Plantar Fasciitis

This condition is also known as heel spurs, Morton’s neuroma, or runner’s knee. It’s an inflammation of the tissue around the heel bone (plantar fascia). The plantar fascia helps support the arch of your foot and attach your heel to the sole of your foot. When this tissue becomes inflamed, it causes pain in the area below your heel, on both sides of your lower leg (the calf), and sometimes up into your hamstring muscles. Plantar fasciitis can be caused by prolonged standing or walking; excessive pronation (rolling inward) of the foot; wearing shoes with too much give in them; inadequate stretching before exercise; and using inappropriate weights at the gym.

Bursitis

Bursitis is an inflammation of one or more bursae, small sacs that lubricate and protect the tissue around joints. The most common bursitis is behind the ankle (posterior bursitis), but it can also occur in other areas of the foot and ankle, including the ball of the foot, heel, and midfoot. Causes of posterior bursitis include overuse, poor posture, and a high instep (the part of your foot near the toes).

Jamming

This is when one or more joints become trapped between two pieces of bone or cartilage. This can cause pain, tenderness, swelling, redness, and limited movement. Causes of jamming include injuries (such as ankle sprains), arthritis, and conditions such as gout.

Front Ankle Pain Causes

Front Ankle Pain Causes

There are many different causes of ankle pain. Some of the most common causes include:

Sprains and Strains

The most common cause of ankle pain is a sprain or strain. A sprain occurs when the ligaments that support the joint are stretched or torn. A strain occurs when the tendons that attach the muscles to the bone are stretched or torn. Sprains and strains usually occur after a fall, twist, or direct blow to the joint.

Fractures

One of the most common causes of ankle pain is a fracture. This can happen when the bone in the ankle is broken. Sometimes the fracture can be minor, and the ankle may only feel a little pain. Other times, the fracture may be more serious, and the ankle may feel very painful.

These types of fractures can happen when the ankle is twisted or when it is hit from behind. If the fracture is serious, the ankle may need to be fixed (surgically).

Rupture

Another common cause of ankle pain is a rupture. This happens when the Achilles tendon (a ligament that connects the calf muscle to the heel bone) becomes stretched too far. This can cause a lot of pain and swell in the ankle. Ruptures can also happen when someone falls on their ankle.

Torn Meniscus

A torn meniscus is another common cause of ankle pain. This happens when one of the two cartilage discs in the knee (the medial and lateral menisci) ruptures. The disc usually breaks due to physical trauma, such as a fall or a hard bump. This can cause intense pain and swelling in the ankle. It can also lead to decreased range of motion and even partial or total paralysis in some cases.

Tarsals / Talus Injuries

Another common cause of ankle pain is a tarsal injury. This happens when one of the bones in the ankle — called the tarsal bone — is broken. This can be very painful and lead to swelling and bruising.
Sometimes the tarsal bone can also be displaced (movement). This can cause ankle instability, which can make the pain even worse.

Plantar Fasciitis (PF)

Another common cause of ankle pain is plantar fasciitis (PF). PF is an inflammation of the connective tissue on the bottom of the foot (plantar fascia). This often happens when people put too much pressure on their feet and ankles. PF can also happen due to other injuries, such as an Achilles tendon rupture or a torn meniscus.

Heel Drop Syndromes

Heel drop syndromes can also cause ankle pain. These are conditions where the heel drops lower than the rest of the foot (Plantar dropping). This can lead to compression of the nerves in the ankle and foot, which can cause intense pain. Heel drop syndromes can also be caused by other conditions, such as neuropathy or diabetes.

Diagnosing Front Ankle Pain

Diagnosing Front Ankle Pain

When you experience front ankle pain, it is important to see your doctor for a diagnosis.

  • Many tests can be done to help determine the cause of your front ankle pain.
  • Your doctor may ask you to complete a physical examination, undergo x-rays, or have a blood test done.

If your doctor suspects that you have a problem with your ankle joint, they may perform an MRI scan or a CT scan. Some other tests that may be done include a nerve conduction study or an arthroscopy.

Treatment of Front Ankle Pain

Treating ankle pain is very important and you get it treated as soon as possible. There are a variety of treatments that can be used to help reduce the pain and inflammation that are often associated with ankle pain. These treatments can include:

Medications

One of the most common treatments for ankle pain is medications. Medications can help reduce the inflammation and pain that are associated with ankle pain. Some of the most common types of medications that are used to treat ankle pain include:

Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) – NSAIDs are often used to treat knee, back, and other types of pain. NSAIDs work by reducing the inflammation and pain that are associated with ankle pain.

Opioids are also often used to treat other types of pain. Opioids work by reducing feelings of pain and inflammation. Coxibs are a type of medication that works by preventing the formation of blood clots. This can help reduce the amount of inflammation that is present in the ankle area.

Corticosteroids – Corticosteroids are also a type of medication that can be used to reduce the amount of inflammation and pain that is present in the ankle area.

Physical Therapy

Physical Therapy

There are many types of physical therapy (PT) that can be used to treat front ankle pain. PT can help improve the range of motion, strength, and flexibility of the ankle joint. PT may also help reduce swelling and inflammation in the ankle joint.

Some common types of PT for front ankle pain include:

Dry Needling

Dry needling is one type of PT that is used to treat pain and inflammation in the ankle. Also, Dry needling uses small, sterile needles to penetrate the skin and release energy into the tissues. This energy can help reduce pain and inflammation in the ankle joint.

Toning and Stretching

Toning and stretching may also be used to improve the range of motion, strength, and flexibility in the ankle joint. These exercises may help to reduce swelling and inflammation in the ankle joint.

Balance Training

Balance training may also be used to improve balance and coordination in the ankle joint. This type of training may help to reduce the risk of falls in the future. Some people use this type of PT to treat front ankle pain.

Surgery

Tibial nerve surgery

This type of surgery is called Tibial nerve surgery. It is used to treat front ankle pain caused by problems with the tibial nerve. The tibial nerve is a nerve that runs along the side of your ankle. Sometimes, the tibial nerve can be damaged. This can cause front ankle pain.

Tibial nerve surgery involves removing part of the ankle bone. This allows the tibial nerve to be better accessed. The surgery may also involve repairing the damage to the tibial nerve. After Tibial nerve surgery, front ankle pain may improve.

Conclusion

If you’re struggling with front ankle pain, know that you’re not alone. This is a relatively common condition that can be caused by a variety of factors. However, there are treatments and prevention methods available that can help you find relief. Be sure to talk to your doctor if you’re experiencing any pain in your ankles so they can diagnose the root cause and recommend the best course of treatment for you.

Physical Therapy help patients recover from pain. If you’re experiencing Back painShoulder painKnee painNeck painElbow painHip pain, or Arthritis pain, a physical therapist at MantraCare can help: Book a physiotherapy session.

Try MantraCare Wellness Program free